Op-Ed

Rachel McKinnon
Rachel McKinnon (center), a man who identifies as trans, poses with the first and second runners up at the UCI Masters track championships after beating the women’s world cycling record. (Courtesy: rachelvmckinnon/Twitter)

Los Angeles, California – On Sunday, October 14th 2018, Rachel McKinnon, a 36-year-old Canadian man, became the first man to win gold in the women’s 35-44 age bracket at the UCI Masters track championships.

Man Beats Women in Women’s Sports

 

Public Outcry

McKinnon proudly announced his win on Twitter, but nearly all responses on the social media platform were critical of the ethics of the race.

 

Jen Wagner-Assali, who came in third place, declared the competition unfair and announced: “There’s a group of us working on getting the rules changed.”

Unfair Advantage

Rachel McKinnon
Rachel McKinnon (left). (Credit: ERO Sports)

McKinnon responded with indignation at the suggestion that he is a cheater who used his biological and physiological advantages over women to gain wins that he as a mediocre athlete would not otherwise have.

“There is absolutely no evidence that I have an unfair advantage,” he proclaimed in an interview with Velo News.

However, the sciences have found that men have a higher percentage of fast-twitch muscle fibers than women, allowing men to cycle with more power and at a faster cadence. Men also have larger internal organs than do women, including hearts and lungs. Men’s larger lung size in combination with the greater mass of hemoglobin in men’s blood together mean that men have greater capacity for oxygen. Men have bones that are more dense, and greater muscle mass. Men’s difference in hip structure provides an additional advantage in cycling.

None of these qualities – which grant male cyclists a significant advantage over female cyclists – simply vanish due to a man’s inner identity, feelings, consumption of hormones, or even gender-affirming cosmetic surgeries.

Additionally, no women – including women who have disorders of sexual development (previously known as “intersex” conditions) – have testosterone levels anywhere near as high as men, including men like McKinnon who identify with gender identity and use cross-sex hormones. The average woman has 2.8 NMOL/L of testosterone, while the average man has 23-25 NMOL/L.

The Transabled

There is a growing number of people – mainly men – who identify as “trans-abled.” While such an individual is able-bodied, his or her brain does not properly map to a certain body part. Therefore, the brain refuses to accept that the limb is a valid part of the person’s own body.

Such individuals go as far as to present and live as disabled people, or even render themselves disabled by destroying or amputating the limb that offends them once they are unable to convince a doctor to surgically remove the healthy body part.

In a society that has come to center identity and devalue material reality, is not far-fetched to believed that an able-bodied person will someday enter sports competitions against the disabled, using identity as a defense.

Human Rights

In a January 2018 interview with USA Today, McKinnon declared:

We cannot have a woman legally recognized as a trans woman in society, and not be recognized that way in sports. Focusing on performance advantage is largely irrelevant because this is a rights issue. We shouldn’t be worried about trans people taking over the Olympics. We should be worried about their fairness and human rights instead.

McKinnon insisted in the interview that participation in sports is a natural human right, and that those who identify as transgender must have the absolute right to compete in sports – and without any checks and balances, such as limits on testosterone imposed by the International Olympic Committee in an effort to decrease the natural advantage transgender-identified men have over the women they’re now allowed to compete against in sports.

“This is bigger than sports and it’s about human rights,” McKinnon claims. “By catering to cisgender people’s views, that furthers transgender people’s oppression.”

Biologically male people, regardless of internal sense of gender, have always had the right to play sports, however. It is women who had to fight long and hard for centuries to have a place in sports. The right had not yet gained a strong foothold, as girls and women are still largely forbidden to participate in sports in some places in the world. In nations that bar women from sports, like Iran, women’s professional teams are filled by men posing as women.

As people who are biologically male enter women’s sports in growing numbers, the small place that women carved out for women and their daughters rests on shaky foundation.

 

Read more about this story

Transgender Sports: Men and Women Have Physical Differences That No Surgery or Hormone Treatment Can Change

The Stream
Kate Hall won the 100m sprint at regionals her sophomore year. But a year later, Hall was beat by Andraya Yearwood, a high school freshman. Yearwood was born male but “identifies” as female. At the time of the race, he had not undergone hormone treatment or surgery to “transition from male to female.” Much of the debate about “transgender” athletes has focused on testosterone. Consider the NCAA policy for such transgender athletes focuses only on testosterone. Testosterone plays a big role in athletic performance. But when we start talking about high-performance competition, especially in track and field, small variations make all the difference. These go well beyond testosterone.

Professor of physiology says transgender athletes have advantage in speed, power

Stuff.co.nz
A New Zealand physiology professor says transgender athletes have advantages over their female competitors and more research needs to be done by sporting regulators before they should compete against each other. Otago University professor in physiology Alison Heather has researched transgender changes, particularly in top level sport. She is adamant international sporting regulation bodies such as the International Olympic Committee (IOC) have rushed a decision to include transgender athletes in male and female categories, as there has not been enough research.

McKinnon is First Transgender Woman to Win World Title

Cycling News
Rachel McKinnon became the first transgender woman to win a world title at the 2018 UCI Masters Track Cycling World Championships at the VELO Sports Center in Los Angeles, California, on Sunday. Representing Canada, McKinnon beat Carolien Van Herrikhuyzen (Netherlands) in the gold-medal round of the women’s 35-44 sprint. “First transgender woman world champion…ever,” McKinnon posted on Twitter following the event.

‘Not fair’: Runner-up fumes over transgender world champion

Yahoo! Sports
A Canadian transgender athlete has been slammed by a competitor after becoming the first to win a cycling world championship. Dr Rachel McKinnon, who was born a male, won gold in the women’s 35-44 age bracket at the UCI Masters track championships in Los Angeles on Sunday. “First transgender woman world champion…ever*”, she posted on social media alongside a photo on the podium with second- and third-place finishers, Carolien Van Herrikhuyzen of the Netherlands and Jennifer Wagner of the US.

Women and Men in Sport Performance: The Gender Gap has not Evolved since 1983

Journal of Sports Science & Medicine
Sex is a major factor influencing best performances and world records. Here the evolution of the difference between men and women’s best performances is characterized through the analysis of 82 quantifiable events since the beginning of the Olympic era. For each event in swimming, athletics, track cycling, weightlifting and speed skating the gender gap is fitted to compare male and female records. It is also studied through the best performance of the top 10 performers in each gender for swimming and athletics.


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1 COMMENT

  1. “‘There is absolutely no evidence that I have an unfair advantage,’ he stated in an interview with Velo News.”

    oh you mean men’s 5,000 years of slavery, torture, murder and oppression of women, kinda “no evidence?” What exactly have men been subjugating women with over the millennia, FLOWERS?

    whadda imbecile. and according to male standards; ugly as fuck too.

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